Turbolinux vs ubuntu

First, ditch the desktop (GUI). That could help out a ton in freeing up resources. I have a Ubuntu Server running my NAS using software raid and Plex and a few other service 24/7/365. The only time it ever gets shut off is when the power goes out. It has yet to freeze up on me, I have had it up and running over 4 years. CentOS is great for stability and security, but for newer applications and updates Ubuntu has those. If you still choose to run a Desktop (GUI) on CentOS you will still use more resources than you need to. If you can, please do not use a Desktop, unless you need to run GUI applications (which I am not sure why you would do this on the server version of these since any server based application would have a console based version) there is no need for a Desktop (GUI).
I guess knowing more about what you needed it for, we could help you out more. I use CentOS for my more serious web and database servers, but for my personal servers, it is quicker to get a Ubuntu Server up and running.

Despite this, I have never gotten clear on what differentiates different Linuxes. There are different flavors (Debian, Fedora, Arch, CentOS, Gentoo, SUSE,...). These can be the basis for other distributions such as the many Debian-based ones that include the Ubuntu-family (more later), as well as Raspbian, Knoppix, MEPIS, etc. Finally, there are different sub-distributions often characterized by a particular choice of desktop environment. In particular, I'm thinking of the huge number of official and unofficial Ubuntu variants and Ubuntu-based distributions including:

I don't mean to offend, but judging an OS by the small non-essential applications it comes preinstalled with?.. Come on! You named small applications that are so easy to find and install - I can't imagine anyone going for Linux simply because they don't like that Windows comes with IE and doesn't have an email client preinstalled. If one finds it so hard to look for an application online, I don't believe they'll find it easy to use any kind of Linux compared to Windows, especially when they run into problems -- which they most probably will (for example, driver problems) -- and solutions to which are so much harder to find online for an inexperienced user.
And what do you need to read program reviews for? If you're an experienced user, you know what you're looking for. If you're not, your life is not going to get any easier if you switch to Linux because you'll run into other sort of problems. And, by the way, why is it that you need to read reviews for Windows programs, but you don't need to do that when looking for a program for Linux? Simply because you trust that the Software Center's suggestions?

The guest operating system installation guide includes instructions for installing supported guest operating systems on the following VMware products:

  • VMware ESXi/ESX and later
  • VMware Workstation and later
  • VMware Fusion and later
  • VMware ACE and later

Turbolinux vs ubuntu

turbolinux vs ubuntu

The guest operating system installation guide includes instructions for installing supported guest operating systems on the following VMware products:

  • VMware ESXi/ESX and later
  • VMware Workstation and later
  • VMware Fusion and later
  • VMware ACE and later

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