East german trench coat

  The staffing arrangements didn't change over the next two years of operations. Ensign Perry USNR, who was the first commander of the station, relinquished command on 1st February 1943 to Lt J. C. Gamble USNR, but Lt Gamble was transferred on 26th May and Ensign Perry resumed command until 21st March 1944 when Lt M. Preston USNR took over command. The staff included six officers in April 1944 but by June 1944 only two remained. In May 1944 the total complement was 22 enlisted men but this dropped to 11 by June. The station closed at 8:00 AM on 29th May 1945 and was decommissioned soon after.

The calf-high pull-on jackboot had been the traditional footwear of the German soldier for generations. The Wehrmacht boot was little different from that of World War I: made of brown pebbled leather (blackened with polish), with hobnailed leather soles and heel-irons. Trousers were worn tucked inside. Originally 35–39 cm tall, the boots were shortened to 32–35 cm in 1939 in order to save leather. By 1940 leather was becoming more scarce and issue was restricted to combat branches, and in 1941 jackboots were no longer issued to new recruits. By late 1943 production of jackboots had ceased altogether. However, as late as fall 1944 depots were encouraged to issue Marschstiefel to infantry and artillery, to the extent they were available.

East german trench coat

east german trench coat

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